THE MULTIPLIER EFFECT OF GIRLS' EDUCATION

Best Development Investment

The extraordinary, long-term benefits of girls' education have been conclusively demonstrated by countless studies conducted by top economists, academic researchers, and multilateral institutions. Education not only benefits the individual girl who remains in school, but extends far beyond -- to her family, her community, and even her country. Virtually every development indicator improves with greater investment in girls' education - from better family health and lower risks of new HIV infection to increased agricultural productivity, political participation, and per capita income. The evidence is so compelling that many experts believe that girls' education is the single best investment that can be made in a developing country.

"Silver Bullet"

Education for girls is "the closest thing to a silver bullet formula for accelerating human development."

United Nations Human Development Report 2013.

"Huge Impact"

"Girls' education has a huge impact on all of society."
Girls' education: the facts, UNESCO. Education for All Global Monitoring Report, October 2013 Fact Sheet 

Each Year of a Girl's High School Education:

· Increases her future income 10-25%

· Lowers her risk of HIV infection

· Improves her future health outcomes

· Lowers her risk of early marriage 

· Lowers her risk of dying in childbirth 

· Improves the health outcomes and educational prospects of her future children 

World Bank studies compiled by the Council on Foreign Relations, 2004

Most Effective Means of Development with Highest Rate of Return

"[E]ducating girls is the most urgent task facing the global development community....Girls’ education is the most effective means of combating many of the most profound challenges to human development." 

The Multiplier Effect of Educating Girls, UNICEF, The State of the World's Children, 2004.

 

"When all the benefits are taken into account, educating girls yields a higher rate of return on investment than any that can be made in the developing world." 

Lawrence Summers, Vice President & Chief Economist, World Bank, "Investing in All the People," 1992.